Ola Sallnäs

Forest management, landscape change and production vs. risk for storm damage

Ola Sallnäs
Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden
Day 2 10:50-11:40

Sweden is a heavily forested land mainly situated in the boreal region with spruce and pine as dominating species. Historically the forest was regarded as primarily a raw-material supplier to the industrial sector. The Swedish forest industry is export oriented and of high imporatnce for the national economy. Starting in the middle of the last century, the forest management paradigm changed to a even-aged management system, using final felling and artifical regenartion as core components. As a result we see today a situation with intensively managed, highly productive forests. This development has also contributed to to the high numbers of ungulates in the landscape. The high productivity in spruce forests together with the grazing pressure on young forests of pine has lead to a high proportion of spruce in the forest. When the storm “Gudrun” hit southern Sweden in 2005, it became clear that the development had driven the forest state into a high risk situation. The damage was of a magnitude never seen before in Sweden. Shortened rorations have been proposed as a remedy to the high risk level. However, if the rotations are shortened enough to significantly decrease the risk, the comparative production advantage of spruce could vanish.


Ola Sallnäs

Professor in forest operations at SLU, Sweden. I have for a long time been working with regional large-scale forest dynamics modelling on the Swedish and European scale. Management planning on he landscape scale, where wood production should be balanced with other ecosystem products and services has come more and more in focus. In turn this led to an interest in the different roles and function of policy making and planning in forestry governance.